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finding some kind of religion is way for solace and community building in the prisons s. so there, you know, there's sometimes a lot of kind of good community building that comes with that, and that's why the aclu's actually been -- has litigated to protect the religious rights of prisonerses access to places to worship and things like that because there's actually a lot of good that can come from people finding that kind of community. one more question? >> hi. i heard that aclu mostly helps people that are in prison. what about people that have been through the prison experience and perhaps witnessed police misconduct and tampering with evidence, things of that nature? what, you know, what could be done? i know there's postconviction release, and there's the other thing where they take the charges off like that, i forget what it's called, but, um -- >> yes. we do a lot of work on prison reform -- police reform. our affiliates especially work on excessive use of force cases, we work on racial profiling matters. we kind of run the gamut on police misconduct and police reform. we are som
are a satanic religion, you cannot rationally argue with people who think that the earth was created 6000 years ago and adam and eve road on the backs of dinosaurs. the only thing they you can do is integrate them back into the economy. when you fall to that level of desperation, and this is exactly what tore apart yugoslavia a year ago, we had several hundred white guys dressed in confederate in remorse, marching through montgomery. -- uniforms, marching through montgomery. you cannot carry out a dialogue. that is what frightens me. movements of celebrate the language of violence, demonize the marginal and week, whether feminists, african-americans, liberals -- i see that breakdown occurring because of the economic disintegration. having lived through it in places like yugoslavia, rational arguments do not work. her >> tomorrow night and watched this entire event with supporters of the occupied movement. -- tomorrow night you can watch this entire event but supporters of the occupied movement. -- occupy movement. 8:00 eastern time here on c- span. >> the big discussion that i remember was, wha
. host: democratic caller. caller: republicans always find their religion when measures are needed that do not affect areas that are concerned by them. when katrina relief was needed, the federal debt and deficit was ballooning, and we did not see anybody spending up there, and we needed of since 36 offsets all the way up until the president got into -- needed offsets' until this president got into office. everything was already in place under republican-led spending, but now they have found religion and want to cut these programs said affect people that did not cause the economic downturn or the ballooning of the debt. they always find religion what it does not affect them. guest: let me just be clear that the club for growth has had a clear position on this. we are accused of being uncarin g let it comes to disaster relief, and it is not fair, because we want people to get the relief they need to love but we believe it should be paid for. the government should set money aside for emergencies. we can predict there will be emergencies every year. history has done that they will hel
caller. >> caller: it's deplorable that republicans always find their religion when measures are needed that doesn't affect areas of their concern. i didn't see anybody asking for offsets when, and the federal debt and deficit was blooming with george bush, and nobody wanted offsets to help those in the disaster relief all the way up until this president got in office. he came in with a federal debt and deficit already ballooned, but everybody found religion on spending after george bush hut the wars on the credit card and the medicare part d on the credit card. it was under already, and now they found religion and cut all programs that affect people that didn't cause the downturn or didn't cause the ballooning of the debt so they find religion when it doesn't affect them. >> guest: the club for growth had a consistent position on this. we are akooked of being uncaring when it comes time to disaster relief, and it's an up fair accusation because we want people to get help that they need, but we think it ought to be paid for and not to put the burden or spread the burden larger. it shoul
at the inauguration in my opinion. it would be more inclusive without it. sure, but i think religions should be taxed if they get involved in politics. like them or not, they have every right to be part of the process. give the dude the opportunity to put forth his ideas before you toast him. people learn and change. this from scott, i have no problem with the pastor speaking, although my opinion differs from his. i would welcome his presence at the speech. keep the conversation going facebook.com/carolcnn. >>> headaches, sleepless nights. bernie kosar former nfl quarterback has had them all after playing ball. now kosar says a new treatment has stopped his symptoms.  >>> as we got confirmation that junior seau did indeed suffer from the brain disease cte, another former nfl player who took multiple hits speaks with hope for his future. and we are talking about former browns quarterback bernie kosar. i hope the treatment he's getting really does work. >> yeah, so far it has given him great progress and i think that that's hope not only for bernie but for other players who might be suffering. b
are hard-core religion. they are going to do what they want to do. if they wanted some kind of change, the people themselves would have fought just like our forefathers fought for our rights. host: more from the front page article in "the wall street journal." joseph from cincinnati, ohio on the line for republicans. caller: hello. how are you doing? i am glad to be able to comment. i think this is a very historic moment. i am proud of obama and karzai getting up there. we have to end the war some time. my thesis is if we have the talent than -- taliban, terrorism has to be fought all over the world. this is the message they are both saying. it is a long drawn out war. it has to end sometime. if we are pulling out a little sooner, there will be critics saying a lot of different things. i really pray and hope this is successful. the education i think is very important. host: jim from tennessee on the line for independents. caller: i watched the press conference between the two presidents. karzai and his government are one of the most corrupt governments ever. we have lost billions of d
's major religions right now including the evangelical churches to say this is a moral and religious issue, okay. from our worldview, from our standpoint, this is crucial both because we were commanded by god in genesis to till and tend the garden, to care for his creation which when he created he kept telling us, "it is good." okay, it is our responsibility they would say to take care of his creation, and that the kinds of things that we are currently doing to the planet are essentially violating that promise. but moreover, we're also seeing the theme of social justice, that we've been commanded, they would say, to take care of the least of these. the poor, the sick, the powerless both in our own country and around the world. and many churches, in fact, have invested enormous resources, i mean, sending their young people abroad to do great works to try to help people who desperately need that help. their argument would be how can we in good conscience ignore a problem that's just going to push millions of more people around the world into those exact same kinds of circumstances we're tryi
, i think for a lot of people in prison, finding some kind of religion is a way for solace and for community building in the prisons, and so there, you know, there is -- there's sometimes a lot of kind of good community building that comes with that, and that's why the aclu's litigated to protect the religious rights of prisoners, religious access, access to places to worship and things like that because there's actually a lot of good that can come from people finding that kind of community. one more question? >> i heard that aclu, housing people in prison, but what about people who have been through the prison, and, perhaps it's witnessing conduct, and what's, you know, what is the goal? there's conviction to read, and there's the other thing with the charge, and -- >> we do a lot of work on police reform. affiliates, especially, work on excessive use of force cases. they work on racial profiling matters. we run the gamet on police reform. we are sometimes working collaboration with police departments to reform their policies and practices and training, and so we do a lot
activity. and nora, what is your little issue with organized religion? you are so smart, too. and you analyze everything instantly like these other two guys. and your very, very frustrated. you have a desire to acquire things. you're a really good listener, contrast to what randi says about you. and i won't talk about your sex life, but, honey, it was dynamite, wasn't it? >> oh, baby! >> thank you so much. >> i'm thrilled he didn't bring that up in our handwriting. good thing we don't have a camera on you, nora, in the control room. curt bagget, thank you very much. that was quite entertaining. >> thank you. >> whoa! >> apparently we're both trying to take over. i have a huge ego. >> you keep your ego in check. i'm going to take over now. i'm taking over. >> geez. oh, my gosh. >> well, that was interesting, wasn't it? >> it was. it was fun. thank you, curt. >>> coming up, we'll tell you why tide -- yes, detergent tide, is one of the hottest items on the black market. that story coming up at 10:00 am. >> i have some things to work through. [ male announcer ] break the grip of back or a
or a christian prayer into the schools you also have to be very sensitive to other religions, muslim faith, jewish faith. >> hurdles are plenty but conservatives have a better than two to one majority in the legislature right now. senator cruz is more driven by the talk than changing law. he writes, my intention on the legislation was to foster a conversation about religious liberty. comfortable or not, he has. >> jamie: and gilbert is the one that was reporting. we say thank to you to both. >> gregg: war without ending. all paying a deadly price. now world powers are calling for the syrian government to be held accountable for all the bloodshed. >> jamie: plus a debate over gun control. new rules and restrictions may be on the way. >> we know that -- there is no silver bullet. as one of my friends said, there is no seat belt to put on to make sure there will not be a circumstance again. hey, our salads. [ bop ] [ bop ] [ bop ] you can do that all you want, i don't like v8 juice. [ male announcer ] how about v8 v-fusion. a full serving of vegetables, a full serving of fruit. but what you t
of people in prison, finding some kind of religion is a way for solace and for community building in the prison. but so, there is, there's something a lot of kind of good community building that comes with that, that's why the aclu has actually been, has litigated to protect the religious rights of christians, access to places to worship and things like that, because there's actually a lot of good that can come from people find that kind of community. >> one more question. >> i heard that aclu wodehouse people veteran prison. what about people who have been through prison -- with police misconduct or whatever it is. you know, what could be done? [inaudible] the other thing where they take the charges off. i forget what it's called. >> yes. we do a lot of work on police reform. our affiliates especially work on excessive and abusive force cases. they do work on racial profiling matters. we kind of run the gamut on police misconduct and police reforms. we are sometimes working in collaboration with police departments to reform their policies and practices and training. and so we do
. these are a bunch of criminals. but those who use religion in order to kill collectively and supporting gangsters, every time the army stands hand in hand with the people, they come closer to their demise. however, they began to kill in the front lines. they used blood shed. the ideology of religious difference is new to us, and is something strange to us. we have terrorists that have the ideology of al-qaeda, describe themselves as jihadists, they lead terrorist organizations in the ground. the use of back lines in order to lead thieving and looting to help those religious groups who know nothing but the language of killing and bloodshed. we, brothers, fight against these people. many of them are not syrians. they came for sinister ideologies and falls ideologies that they call jihad, which is far from jihad and islam. the people we are facing are those ideologues of al qaeda. three decades ago, we know how they were sponsored by the west and by arab money. after the demise of the soviet union, they went from afghanistan. they went into the west. they tried to get rid of them in afghanistan and
" that pokes fun at religion and just about everything else, too. >> did you expect it to catapult your career the way it did? >> no. i thought it would ruin my career. >> reporter: it certainly didn't. his career is flourishing. he's done movies, tv and once worked on ""the daily show." >> josh gadd. thank you very much. >> reporter: he grew up in florida and learned at an early age to use humor as protective armor. i was the product of a divorced household. it was kind of a painful period when i was about 6 and the one weapon that i always had was making my family laugh. >> reporter: laughing is what "1600 penn" is all about. that, and family dynamics, like trying to get a hug from the president when he happens to be your dad. in this case, i thought i could help. >> i know somebody that will hug you. do you want to try it? ♪ >> reporter: a nice hug, right? >> and carl and the cast was thrilled to have a screening of the series at the white house and president obama got to give his two cents. >> i don't know who is more charming him or you. twinkle. be calling you that from now on. >> don'
. connell: think about this and take as you said take religion out of it for a moment because it brings up kind of the wider discussion of how do we use technology to, you know, make us more efficient or even make us safer. we're having all these discussions in schools about after the shooting in connecticut maybe something like this or more technology would be used. but you can't force people to do it, you're saying. >> let me try and crystallize the argument for you, one school of thought is you need to balance safety with freedom. and then freedom will include privacy. another school of thought is safety and privacy are not equal. privacy is the greater good. privacy is a natural right. i can keep myself safe, but i need the government to stay away from me to keep my privacy. there's no balance between them. it's a bias in favor of privacy. the burden should be on the government to prove why this is necessary, not on the defendant, the student, to prove why this is harmful. dagen: but the momentum is toward greater security. >> yes, the government either based on sound reasoning and log
. >> stripper poles. >> i was going to say religion but i thought it would be inappropriate. >> maybe. >> so, you know, there is a lot of movement on this whole gun control thing which i think, you know, it's good for the country, for one. for us to have this conversation about gun control and clearly figure out what gun control really means for, you know, this country, especially after sandy hook and a lot of other stuff that's happened but interestingly enough, joe biden will be meeting with the nra. that was announced by jay carney. let's get the clip of that. >>? >> this is not a problem that can be somed by gun legislation alone. it is not a problem that can be solved by any specific action or single action that the government might take. it's a problem that encompasses issues of mental health of he had cations as well as access to guns. >> i think interesting about that, you know, i think we have to, you can't just look at banning guns in a vacuum. you have to look at all of the things surrounding gun violence in this currentlyountry. i think that i
at public schools in indiana amid what he calls attack on religion, is this a good idea? >> let's ask fox news religion contributor father jonathan morris. >> anger people and i would put this on facebook and twitter and people got angry and my mom called me and got upset. >> alisyn: wow. >> i said i don't agree with this legislator's approach. let me explain why. when we say public schools, what we really mean is government schools. these are -- we have given to the government the role of educating our children. i think that's a bad idea in the first place, very bad idea. but if we say that the government can mandate in in case a certain prayer, you must-- all schools pray our father. and we should also be totally open to the idea of another legislator or another court saying that bypass saj age of t koran should be mandated in the school? do you we want that? very good answer. >> you're correctly uncomfortable with the the government pushing a specific dogma and i share that. on the other hand, government schools push a certain dogma every day. i mean, textbooks, push a certain world vi
's a wave of intolerance sweeping this country. intolerance of any public expression of god or religion, it's a wave and sweeping this country. >> tucker: where is it coming from? >> certainly interest spokes people, activists who would like to wipe the face of god not only of public conscious. >> alisyn: what he's saying, he doesn't believe that president obama believes every word of the bible. if you don't believe every word and many americans don't. >> because we don't practice all ten commandments take them down from the courtroom. right now it totally makes sense to do what he is suggesting, get rid of the bible, get rid of any prayer in the inauguration, right? we should get, totally take "in god we trust" off the dollar bill. we should absolutely get rid of any expression whatsoever of religion, if we believe, if we believe that true meaning of separation of church and state means that god stays within the walls of a church. and that's what these activists are doing. we should also take the mention of god out of our constitution, in god we trust, really? >> well, this guy is not goin
's actually based in three different influences. there is superstition. there is religion and there is culture. i'll give you a couple of examples. >> alisyn: let's talk about the superstition -- sorry, the lucky las vegas. people in las vegas, you found, are price -- what's the commonnallity of how they're pricing their properties? >> well, of course, the slot machines and 7, 7, 7. that's the lucky number. so people are pricing their homes with their lucky number 777. and i have an example. this is a great con did he that's actually for sale right now in las vegas and it's priced at $777,000. it's three bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths. 2800 square feet. beautiful unit. and it's got incredible dead on views of the las vegas strip and priced with that lucky number. i even got a tweet this morning from a realtor who seder his client is a gambler and he priced it at 777,000, $777. people do it. >> alisyn: that's the jackpot. let's talk about what you said about religion. what have you noticed in the bible belt states about pricing? >> well, obviously in bible belt, in the new testament and in the bible, jo
to and resort to their private matters, based on their ritual, that prescribe to their beliefs and religion. >> one of your advisers, speaking of egyptian jews, caused controversy the other day, when he suggested that egyptian jews living in israel should come back to egypt. >> translator: these words were said in a specific context, and the one who said it said it in this way to demonstrate what he wanted to say from his point of view. but there are many media outlets that removed it from the general context. however, he is no longer an adviser to me, because now he is a member of the legislative counsel in the shirra council and hes most likely a leader in this council, and it is not right to group the legislative council and the executive council together in this stage, because he is not my adviser now. cnn correspondent ian lee has been in egypt for several years and speaks arabic. he says there are serious divisions within the country. so talk about those divisions. >> well, on one side, you have the opposition, which in the past, has been unorganized. at this time, against present, th
that pokes fun at religion and just about everything else too. >> did you expect it to catapult your career? >> no. i thought it would hurt my career. >> his career is flourishing. he has done movies, tv, and once worked on the daily show. >> josh gadd. thank you very much. >> he grew up in florida where he learned at a very young age to use humor as a protective coat of arm our. >> i was the product of a divorced household. it was kind of a painful period when i was about 6. and the one weapon that i always had was making my family laugh. >> and laughing is what "1600 penn" is all about. that and family dynamics, like trying to get a hug from the president when he happens to be your dad. in this case i thought i could help. i know somebody that will hug you. do you want to try it? nice hug, right? and, carl, the cast was thrilled to have a screening of the series last night at the white house. president obama got to give his two cents. >> twinkle. we'll be calling you that from now on. >> don't get it confused with tinkle, please. >> catch it don't right here on nbc. up next, the oscar nom
, tried or religion but by conscious choice. our choices are defined by constitution and values of a tolerant culture, democratic society and a market-driven economy. in shaping the international environment for space activities, the estate should she -- seek to build the most prosperous world in which our values are taken be on earth. in doing so we should also exercise some humility and face of the unknown. did thomas jefferson know the ultimate economic return or impact of the investment into the investment into we see in the purchase and the lewis and clark expedition? the teddy roosevelt in building the panama canal? did kennedy with apollo? in their time these projects were controversial and criticize in congress, but who today would say it should not have been done. we see these efforts define us as a nation, a nation that pioneers the next frontier. let me conclude by observing that we're all in this together. the white house, congress and u.s. government agencies for international partners, space station, science station, size me, universities, research center. many u.s
not defined by blood or religion but a conscious choice. in shaping the international environment for space activity, the u.s. should build a more prosperous world in which our values are taken beyond. we should also exercise some humility in facing the unknown. in their time these projects were controversial and criticized. who today would have said they should not have been done? we have seen these efforts to define us as a nation who pioneers the next frontier. we are all in this together, white house, congress, international partners and many u.s. companies that operate the capabilities. in think this committee for holding this hearing today. i will be happy to answer any questions you might have. >> thank you. i think all of you for your testimony. the committee limits questioning to five minutes for each of us. i will open a round of question. i do not ever like to say this is my last day. i do not anything last. i do not even like them to call an airport a terminal. i am thinking of the wonderful testimony you have given in the time it took you to get that ensued deliver it to us. it
fishing. >> one of my co-workers is a fish guru and watches this like a religion and told me they're biting like crazy. >> reporter: it didn't take long. within minutes, the squid were hitting the deck, lots of them. katie mason brought along her kids, including 5-year-old catalina. >> well, i warned them, it's wet, it's dirty, it's crazy. so i wanted them to kind of have that experience. >> they're really big. >> it's like pulling up a volkswagen tire. >> reporter: putting up a fight and squirting water and ink at everyone on board. >> once they come up and they get in the light, you can catch as many as you want really quickly. >> reporter: the last time so much jumbo squid showed up here was back in 2009 and the discovery channel just shot this first-ever video of an elusive 600-pound giant squid. why are so many suddenly showing up off the california coast? we asked marine biologist chris plant. >> it is remarkable we're seeing them in the density worry seeing them in. we can only guess that they're chasing food. they could be eating anything from small krill all the way up to
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)

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